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What is the difference between 'I was' and 'I was used to'

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Created Date: Tue 06 Sep 2011

Note:

What is the differences between the following phrases:
1) "I was"
2) "I was used to"
3) "I used to"

 

Answer:
I was: is used to indicate a fact.
For example: I was a primary school teacher.
(In the past, I was a teacher at a primary school but now I'm not)

I was used to: If you are used to something, you are accustomed to it
+ Be used to is always followed by a noun or gerund (verb ending in ing).
For example, I can say I am used to staying up late.

I used to: means I did something regularly in the past which I no longer do now
For example: I used to jog 4 kilometers every day.


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IELTS Writing Sample

Mandatory Financial Education

IELTS Writing Sample - Task 2

Financial education should be mandatory component of the school program. To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement?
Go To Sample

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